Saturday, September 20, 2014

2014-09-19 (F) Smart Pocket Watch

A small “antique brass” finish hinge was purchased to go between the faux pocket watches and provide a clamshell enclosure. The hinge was trimmed down with a metal cutting band saw. This was for aesthetic reasons. The hinge was trimmed so that the screw holes were no longer a pert of the hinge. The cough edges were cleared up using a belt sander. The “antique brass” finish still looks good in most places but the cut sections are much shinier. A second hinge was modified in case the first was destroyed in the process.

 Modifying hinge on band saw

Cut hinge next to uncut hinge

Sanded hinge next to freshly cut hinge

The faux pocket watches had the backside of the decorative winding knob take off with the belt sander. The faux pocket watches seem to be primarily aluminum. The two pieces now fit together flush.

 Pocket watch knob about to be sanded off

Flat where a knob used to be

Two watches sitting flush

Pilot holes were drilled in the hinges and faux pocket watches. The holes in the pocket watches were then drilled with a #43 bit and tapped. The hinge was drilled to accommodate a #4 bolt and then countersunk.

 Pilot holes in pocket watches

Taping the pocket watches

Drilling holes in hinge

Countersinking hinge holes

To do:
  • Buy brass countersunk #4-40 bolts
  • Devise button pressing apparatus
  • Find suitable background
  • Insulate top watch or buy copper foil tap
  • Fill around watch
  • Build buttons
  • Install buttons

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, September 19, 2014

2014-09-18 (Th) ESPeri.Impass

Hollow leather punches were purchased for making tiny neoprene washers and modifying them. A 1/4" punch was selected first and a 1/4" hole was made in a neoprene washer which had already been used for material with the paper hole punch. The 1/4" disc was not a clean cut but it was slightly larger than the disc taken using the paper hole punch so it didn't fit inside the flanged spacer loosely. The process was repeated with a 7/32" leather punch which produced a disc slightly smaller than the disc made with the paper hole punch. The 7/32" and paper hole punch disc were punched in the center with a 1/8" hole punch to make them into neoprene washers. The hollowed out paper hole punch disc had a section cut away with the 1/8" hole punch to look like a partial moon with a hole in the center.

 1/4" punch on a neoprene washer

Paper hole punch disc next to the 1/4" disc

Paper hole punch disc next to 7/32" disc

Slight differences between hole sizes

Hollowed out neoprene disc. Neoprene washers

Modified washer

To do:
  • Add small bit of metal to gap of washer
  • Reduce 1/4" inertial mass tip
  • Wrap longer spring with fine brass wire
  • Test + Evaluate longer spring design
  • Test + Evaluate tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-09-18 (Th) Rotational Photography Rig

Today was a busy day. I started two new projects, this and the Prismatic Stereoscopic Camera Adapter, I made soup, and I made curry. Pictured above. If you would like the recipe please consult your cabinets and grab whatever you can fit in a pan. Add curry. Cook until it looks like it has been eaten once already. Serve over rice.

The best way to really get an idea of an item is to touch it, hold it, use it, take it apart, and see its guts. I try to do a good job of showing the guts of what I build but it's the internet so the tactile sensations will have to wait until better peripherals exist. In the mean time I like to show rotational views because they give a spatial sense to what's being seen. Personally, I think they look cool.

My original intention was to use a continuous rotation servo motor to slowly spin a rotating platform, a lazy Susan, and activate a camera shutter whenever the servo motor turned a full rotation as the servo stopped then make a full stop once the lazy Susan made one complete rotation. It was going to be controlled by Arduino.

As I built this project the automation seemed overkill. Usually I'm all about overkill but I stopped myself this time with the hope that more people will actually build one of these. That is not to say that I won't build a deluxe version in the future.

Enough background.
----------

A dull2 1/2" (63mm) hole cutting saw was inserted into a drill press and a piece of scrap 1/2" (12mm) plywood was cut half way, flipped and the cut was completed from the other wised to avoid hole blowout. The dull bit left scorch marks on the wood due to excessive friction. The wooden biscuit was sanded on a belt sander by first holding the center hole and allowing the the biscuit to spin. A more effective method was to place a screwdriver the hole and allowing it to spin on the sander while holding it an an angle to the belt travel direction.

 2 1/2" hole saw

Wooden biscuit made with hole saw

Sanding biscuit with belt sander and hand

Sanding biscuit with belt sander and axle

The sanded disc was divided into eighths by sight using a steel rule. Spots were marked 1/4" (6mm) from the edge on each segment line and small holes were drilled. Countersunk neodymium magnets were installed at each hole with screws which came with the magnets. There is a magnet approximately every inch (25mm) on the circumference of the wheel. The number of pictures taken in a given session will be determined by the circumference of the rotating platform.

Wooden disc divided into eighths

Holes and first magnet attached

A band of silicone coated tape was cut and applied to the outside of the disc. Rubber bands could take the place of the silicone tape which is in place to provide traction between the wheel and the rotating platform.

 Silicone tape and magnet wheel

Magnet wheel mounted to gear motor

To do:
  • Install power cord
  • Modify bluetooth camera remote
  • Mount wheel

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-09-18 (Th) Prismatic Stereoscopic Camera Adapter

3D photography isn't hard to find. The HTC EVO 3D has a dual lens camera for taking 3D pictures. A few consumer cameras came out which had two lenses and screens that can display in 3D without eyewear.  Dual lens 35mm cameras existed a long time ago for taking photographs to go in special slide viewers. Video cameras would be outfitted with red and blue filters to make the 3D movies where people wore the blue and red paper glasses.

The common theme of cameras made before is they all have two lenses. I wanted to make an adapter so an ordinary camera could take a split screen stereoscopic picture. To do this I wanted to arrange four prisms so one half of a picture would be taken a few centimeters to the left of the camera lens and the other half of the picture would be taken a few centimeters to the right of the camera lens. The overall picture could be printed and place in a stereoscopic viewer or the camera could be placed in the viewer or any number of stereoscopic viewers like the LEGO Virtual Reality Visor.

Enough background.
----------

A 100mm (4 inch) right angle prism was purchased with the intention of cutting it into four pieces. The prism was made from plastic, likely acrylic resin. To ensure equal sized pieces a jig was made from scrap wood. An end was shortened so it could pass under the guard of a band saw while pushing a prism. Part of the removed wood was cut away, sanded smooth, and screwed into place 24 mm from the end. The 24mm was to allow for some loss due to the cutting blade. The actual length of the right angle prism was slightly long than 100mm. The jig was placed against the saw blade and held to the table sled with two clamps.

Scrap wood shortened on one side

24mm gap from the end of the shortened wood

An accurate 24mm gap 

Placement of the jig 

Tape was applied to the surface of the prism so it would not be scratched when slid along the band saw's table. The tape was placed and trimmed so it would not interfere with the cutting. Four identical pieces were cut with a 3mm slice left over. The first three pieces were cut with the prism on the hypotenuse side touching the table. The last piece was switched so the right angle was between the table and the vertical face of the jig. This angle was the most practical and would be used again if another model was made using cut prisms.

 Table sled used to push the prism through the cutting blade

First cut prism

Four prisms

The prisms were arranged on a sticker applied to a piece of clear acrylic sheet. The acrylic did not need to be clear but it was freely available as scrap. The outlined shape was cut out by scoring on each side of the plastic and snapping it by hand.

 Arrangement of prisms and sketch on sticker

Scoring the plastic with a steel rule and a razor knife

Prisms arranged on acrylic sheet

Photo taken through loosely arranged prisms

To do:

  • Glue prisms to acrylic sheet
  • Glue magnet to prisms
  • Test
  • Order new fisheye lens to replace broken one


Journal page 1

Journal Page 2

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

2014-09-17 (W) Charged: DesertIrish

Jason made the idea of standing up to a military vessel seem feasible. Heather filled in Shana about the ship and its more exotic parts. Jason and Head talked about armament. Motor and Dawson talked about moving the operation to Minnesota. Motor said that Dawson should talk to Jason. Jason tells Dawson he wants to take The Flying Machine immediately and leave for three weeks. Dawson is willing to extend it by three days in exchange for his remote assistance to keep the project going.

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power"
Total word count: 3 456 + 60 228 + 83 897 = 147 581 words

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

2014-09-16 (Tu) Smart Pocket Watch


Materials were assembled and purchased to make the buttons accessible from the outside of the watch. Small brass brads were purchased since they are already button shaped with a post that can be spread out to hold it in place. Another option is to insert long pins into the tops of the watch cases since a hole runs the whole distance unimpeded. This will make it necessary to have two visible posts which makes the unit look like an antique stop watch. Another option is to fasten a ring, the same diameter as the watches, around the smart watch so the ring can be pushed and it will contact the buttons.

Jennifer Domeier was consulted for all these discussions and helped reach these conclusions.

To do:
  • Find more suitable rings
  • Trim tops of watches
  • Find suitable background
  • Insulate top watch or buy copper foil tape
  • Fill around watch
  • Build buttons
  • Install buttons

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

2014-09-15 (M) ESPeri.Impass

A neoprene fender washer was cut with a standard paper hole punch. One circle was made which had the original 3/32” hole so a small neoprene washer was created and a a 1/4” ID neoprene was left. Three more 1/4” diameter discs were made using the neoprene washer and hole punch.

 Punching a neoprene washer

Pieces punched from neoprene washer

A 1/4-20 brass bolt was purchased and the head was cut off using a band saw. The cut end was smoothed on a belt sander. A piece of 9/32" ID aluminum tubing was cut with a pipe cutter. The length was based on the length of the brass bolt, compass spinner, plug, and an extension spring which still needed to be constructed. The cut pipe was reamed with a phillips screwdriver which had a 9/32” diameter shaft.

 Aluminum pipe and components to go inside

Cut pipe next to components
Pipe being reamed with screwdriver

The thin brass rod was tightened between two nuts on a #4-40 threaded rod. The brass rod was tightly wound into the threads of the #4-40 threaded rod. The resulting spring was trimmed on one end.

 Tightening brass rod between two nuts

Spring wound on #4-40 threaded rod

Shaping an end with needle-nose pliers
Trimmed spring

The 1/4-20 brass segment had solder applied to the cut end. The newly wound brass spring had the trimmed end tinned with solder. The spring and threaded brass segment were joined so the heavy mass could hang by the spring.

 Solder on ends of brass pieces

Bolt piece hanging from spring
Assembled components next to aluminum tube

The magnet did not spin as freely inside the aluminum tubing which is possibly due to the induced current of the moving magnetic field. This effect can be observed by dropping a powerful magnet through a metal tube. It will fall much slower than gravity would suggest. Information can be found by researching Lenz's Law but the short story is that as the magnet moves by metal it induces a small current and electromagnetism is a direct result of current so the magnet will hug the metal and create friction.

To do:
  • Wrap longer spring with fine brass wire
  • Test + Evaluate longer spring design
  • Build tubular compass
  • Test + Evaluate tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.